The Future of the Professions: How Technology Will Transform the Work of Human Experts by Richard Susskind and Daniel Susskind | LSE Review of Books

We’ve grown accustomed to the decaying hulls of factories and abandoned shopping centres. We’ve begun to see the hollowing out of suburban office parks and we can even envision being transported by fleets of robot taxis. Yet we are working, studying and legislating as though our schools, courts and hospitals will continue as hubs of economic activity abuzz with an app-enabled but largely unchanged cadre … Continue reading The Future of the Professions: How Technology Will Transform the Work of Human Experts by Richard Susskind and Daniel Susskind | LSE Review of Books

Review of Rob Kitchin’s The Data Revolution – Theory, Culture & Society

Rob Kitchin’s The Data Revolution helpfully strips away the hype surrounding ‘big data’ and clarifies key terms. This review suggests some avenues where the book could be taken further, particularly in reference to the performativity of big data discourses and infrastructures, giving the example of Cameron and Palin’s dismantling of the hype around globalisation. It is also suggested that the performative effects of data enact … Continue reading Review of Rob Kitchin’s The Data Revolution – Theory, Culture & Society

The American Psyche on Display: Roger Minick’s ‘Sightseer’ | #ASX

I devised my own way of working.  With a flash-mounted medium-format camera around my neck, I  would spend long hours staked out at overlooks, looking to match up just the right person or couple or group with just the right background––always searching for that particular elusive “something” that constitutes a compelling image. via The American Psyche on Display: Roger Minick’s ‘Sightseer’ | #ASX Continue reading The American Psyche on Display: Roger Minick’s ‘Sightseer’ | #ASX

Fred Lyon photographs San Francisco in his book, San Francisco: Portrait of a City 1940-60.

At 90, Fred Lyon is a legendary San Franciscan photographer. He is now known for capturing the ethereal feel of the city and its people, but in the 1940s and ’50s, Lyon was scrabbling to gain a footing in the magazine industry. Luckily, it was a good time to do so: San Francisco was entering a new golden age, consumed by a post–World War II … Continue reading Fred Lyon photographs San Francisco in his book, San Francisco: Portrait of a City 1940-60.

Bubbling Up the Good Ideas: A Two-Mode Network Analysis of an Intra-Organizational Idea Challenge

Organizations have been experimenting with intraorganizational crowdsourcing (IOC), yet the mechanisms of IOC production remain an underresearched topic. Drawing on a 2-mode ERGM, we examine structural mechanisms and individual-level factors that shape the network structure of idea generation and selection yielded by an IOC idea challenge in a global IT corporation. Results show a Matthew effect leading to 1) highly centralized employee participation around a … Continue reading Bubbling Up the Good Ideas: A Two-Mode Network Analysis of an Intra-Organizational Idea Challenge

Un Chien Andalou – Wikipedia

Un Chien Andalou (French pronunciation: [œ̃ ʃjɛ̃ ɑ̃dalu], An Andalusian Dog) is a 1929 silentsurrealistshort film by the Spanish directorLuis Buñuel and artist Salvador Dalí.[1] It was Buñuel’s first film and was initially released in 1929 with a limited showing at Studio des Ursulines in Paris, but became popular and ran for eight months.[2] The film has no plot in the conventional sense of the word. The chronology of the film is disjointed, jumping from the initial “once … Continue reading Un Chien Andalou – Wikipedia

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (1939) | Books | The Guardian

The Grapes of Wrath grew out of a series of newspaper articles on the California migrant workers entitled The Harvest Gypsies that Steinbeck published in the San Francisco News (illustrated with photographs by Dorothea Lange) from 5 to 12 October, 1936. Writing at the height of the Depression, Steinbeck was on fire with his subject. Like some of the greatest novels in this series, the … Continue reading The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (1939) | Books | The Guardian

Is Facebook’s Trending Topics Biased Against Africa And The Middle East? – Forbes

One of the fascinating byproducts of this week’s Facebook row is that after years of requests from the research community, Facebook has finally released what it asserts is the master guidebook and list of news outlets it considers representative of global events, used to filter its Trending Topics module. While Facebook notes that “Trending is currently available in English in select countries” and thus would … Continue reading Is Facebook’s Trending Topics Biased Against Africa And The Middle East? – Forbes

Contropedia

Collaborative content creation inevitably reaches situations where different points of view lead to conflict. One of the most prominent examples of collaboration online is Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit. It is a system where conflict is mediated by both policy and software, and where conflicts often reflect larger societal debates. We are building a platform for the real-time analysis and visualization of … Continue reading Contropedia

The great leap upward: China’s Pearl River Delta, then and now | Cities | The Guardian

The region where the Pearl River flows into the South China Sea has seen some of the most rapid urban expansion in human history over the past few decades – transforming what was mostly agricultural land in 1979 into what is the manufacturing heartland of a global economic superpower today. Source: The great leap upward: China’s Pearl River Delta, then and now | Cities | … Continue reading The great leap upward: China’s Pearl River Delta, then and now | Cities | The Guardian

A social network analysis of Twitter: Mapping the digital humanities community – Cogent Arts & Humanities – Volume 3, Issue 1 | Cogent OA

Defining digital humanities might be an endless debate if we stick to the discussion about the boundaries of this concept as an academic “discipline”. In an attempt to concretely identify this field and its actors, this paper shows that it is possible to analyse them through Twitter, a social media widely used by this “community of practice”. Based on a network analysis of 2,500 users … Continue reading A social network analysis of Twitter: Mapping the digital humanities community – Cogent Arts & Humanities – Volume 3, Issue 1 | Cogent OA

How should we do the history of Big Data?

Taking its lead from Ian Hacking’s article ‘How should we do the history of statistics?’, this article reflects on how we might develop a sociologically informed history of Big Data. It argues that within the history of social statistics we have a relatively well developed history of the material phenomenon of Big Data. Yet this article argues that we now need to take the concept … Continue reading How should we do the history of Big Data?

如果,是

Wang Xingwei, Untitled, 2008, ® lait 从Bern到Lausanne的车上,对面女士在窗户倒影的重叠,是她给自己画上的第三只眼. // 稻田上留下耕犁的痕迹,是巨型的猫,抓过留下青绿色的深鸿. // http://www.konftel.ch 在绿色丛林的划过,是现代霓虹性的再生,正如texas的marfa小镇的Prada橱窗,自然的原始包容艺术的现代性. 如果反差是现代性存在的理由之一,有一天,我会在这片荒野上,种下陶瓷的西瓜,堆砌不透风的过冬柴木,养一群永远飞不上天的仙鹤.  // 厚重的béton让Bern站台显得毫无生气,昏暗的透不过来,如果自然的构造让从一开始就让物质变得透明,比如像玻璃或者琥珀,béton会透明地承受过往行驶的车俩和阳光,然后像san francisco的polk street色情酒吧的透明地板一样,浇注日常生活中无数的欲望. // 远处的女孩,在除去衣服上多余的线条,从袖口,到领边,再到胸部,让我想起鲁迅笔下孔乙己捉虱子的情景,夕阳下的阳光,洒在车厢,一览无余,正如我毫不掩饰的无逻辑的联想和比喻,我将线条看成了虱子,这样概念的偷换,在刚才看chinese whispers 展览的时候也出现了,有一副画作,表现了同样的道理. 一位裸体的中国姑娘,她的头被换成了带喜字的痰盂,盖上中国过去意识形态的印章,这是中国历史抹不去并且继续存在的精神状态,就像山西小山村党委室的一间破旧的茅屋内,取暖烟囱缭缭青烟的不断升起,而个体意义的完整性,在毛列宁肖像的背景下,早已被一个强权的无形兽魂吞噬了. 过了几分钟,一转眼,对面捉线条的 swiss german女孩不见了,我想她刚才是在fribourg站下车了. // Continue reading 如果,是

Kaiju – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kaijū (怪獣 kaijū?) (from Japanese “strange beast”)[1] is a film genre that features monsters, usually attacking a major Japanese city or engaging other monsters in battle. It is a subgenre of tokusatsu (special effects-based) entertainment. Related terms include kaijū eiga (怪獣映画 kaijū eiga?, monster movie), a film featuring giant monsters or a single monster; kaijin (怪人?, referring to roughly humanoid monsters); and daikaiju (大怪獣 daikaijū?, … Continue reading Kaiju – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Engineering Intelligence Through Data Visualization at Uber – Uber Engineering Blog

In early 2015 we started an official data visualization team at Uber. The idea behind it: deliver intelligence through crafting visual exploratory data analysis tools for Uber’s datasets. Every day, Uber manages billions of GPS locations. Every minute, our platform handles millions of mobile events. Every time we don’t use technology to analyze and interpret this information is an opportunity missed to better understand our … Continue reading Engineering Intelligence Through Data Visualization at Uber – Uber Engineering Blog

Margetts, H., John, P., Hale, S., Yasseri, T.: Political Turbulence: How Social Media Shape Collective Action. (Hardcover)

As people spend increasing proportions of their daily lives using social media, such as Twitter and Facebook, they are being invited to support myriad political causes by sharing, liking, endorsing, or downloading. Chain reactions caused by these tiny acts of participation form a growing part of collective action today, from neighborhood campaigns to global political movements. Political Turbulence reveals that, in fact, most attempts at … Continue reading Margetts, H., John, P., Hale, S., Yasseri, T.: Political Turbulence: How Social Media Shape Collective Action. (Hardcover)

Want to Know What Facebook Really Thinks of Journalists? Here’s What Happened When It Hired Some.

Depending on whom you ask, Facebook is either the savior or destroyer of journalism in our time. An estimated 600 million people see a news story on Facebook every week, and the social network’s founder Mark Zuckerberg has been transparent about his goal to monopolize digital news distribution. “When news is as fast as everything else on Facebook, people will naturally read a lot more … Continue reading Want to Know What Facebook Really Thinks of Journalists? Here’s What Happened When It Hired Some.

Mapping Wikipedia: Geolocated Articles as a Proxy of Culture and Attention | Digital Humanities Specialist

Such is the nature of the modern university that a sudden spark of inspiration can lead to a quick and radical dive into data that, once upon a time, would have taken supercomputers and manpower far beyond the reach of humanities scholars.  When Jon Christensen proposed we explore the possibilities of mapping culture in urban areas, I immediately thought of Eric Fischer’s work mapping Twitter … Continue reading Mapping Wikipedia: Geolocated Articles as a Proxy of Culture and Attention | Digital Humanities Specialist

Neoliberal Tools (and Archives): A Political History of Digital Humanities – Los Angeles Review of Books

Advocates position Digital Humanities as a corrective to the “traditional” and outmoded approaches to literary study that supposedly plague English departments. Like much of the rhetoric surrounding Silicon Valley today, this discourse sees technological innovation as an end in itself and equates the development of disruptive business models with political progress. Yet despite the aggressive promotion of Digital Humanities as a radical insurgency, its institutional … Continue reading Neoliberal Tools (and Archives): A Political History of Digital Humanities – Los Angeles Review of Books

Culture in a World of Bots

Des bots Twitter à la musique générative, de la modification automatique d’articles Wikipedia à la publication de livres sur Amazon, il existe de multiples formes de participation des robots logiciels dans les cultures contemporaines. L’avènement d’une société de Big Data et la mise à disposition de contenus visuels ou sonores par les utilisateurs facilitent leur hybridation et la création de toutes sortes de productions aussi … Continue reading Culture in a World of Bots

Diversifying Your Online World: Ethan Zuckerman’s New Book “Rewire” – MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing

In a new book, MIT’s Ethan Zuckerman asserts that we need to overcome the Internet’s sorting tendencies and create tools to make ourselves ‘digital cosmopolitans.’ The Internet promises a seemingly frictionless way of connecting individuals from around the globe. But in reality, that’s not what happens online: Instead, we clump together with people similar to ourselves, and have those affinities reinforced by tools that guide … Continue reading Diversifying Your Online World: Ethan Zuckerman’s New Book “Rewire” – MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing

Remplacé par des machines ou dirigé par des algorithmes ? | Ethnographies numériques

Il y a quelques semaines, AlphaGo, un programme informatique de la société Deep Mind, a vaincu le joueur coréen Lee Sedol dans une série de parties de Go. Pour divers observateurs, ce fut un moment marquant, car ce jeu de plateau a pendant longtemps été réputé comme difficile à maitriser par des machines. Au-delà de cette victoire, un aspect du dispositif de jeu a attiré … Continue reading Remplacé par des machines ou dirigé par des algorithmes ? | Ethnographies numériques